photo

kamikame-cosplay:

World of Warcraft cosplay: an inside look by Dulcinea Cosplay
Photo byPhotolikeyou

kamikame-cosplay:

World of Warcraft cosplay: an inside look by Dulcinea Cosplay

Photo byPhotolikeyou

photos

video

Watch my sim die bahahaha! 😈

photo

thedirtyprettythings:

I photographed Andrew Scott today. I promise to post more pics when I’m done editing them for my client.
He’s amazing. Very down to earth, polite and witty. And he loved my tattoos. I’m swooning.

thedirtyprettythings:

I photographed Andrew Scott today. I promise to post more pics when I’m done editing them for my client.

He’s amazing. Very down to earth, polite and witty. And he loved my tattoos. I’m swooning.

(via save-jim-moriarty)

photo

thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR MYSTERY- THE ORIGINS OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES
The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. During the Civil War fried chicken took on a new significance. The frying process made chicken less prone to spoilage, allowing women to send it to soldiers fighting in the battlefield.
1600’s.. the Pennsylvania Dutch were eating a version of Chicken and Waffles; however, instead of frying their poultry, they used boiled or roasted chicken, which was then shredded and put on top of waffles with gravy instead of syrup
Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1790s after Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron from France. Recipes for waffles and chicken soon appeared in cookbooks. Because African Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African American families.”
Some historians place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of African Americans to the North. Fried chicken was a common breakfast meat, and serving “a breakfast bread with whatever meat [was available] comes out of the rural tradition.” The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.
Southern cooking would find its way up North, as slaves—freed after the Civil War—were lured by rumor of better jobs and opportunities. The dish can be found in the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells jazz nightclub, and Wells Supper Club
Serving up chicken & waffles”. Los Angeles Business Journal. September 22, 1997. p. 1.
http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2011/03/chicken_and_waffles_a_history_of_a_black_culinary_tradition.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_and_waffles

thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR MYSTERY- THE ORIGINS OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. During the Civil War fried chicken took on a new significance. The frying process made chicken less prone to spoilage, allowing women to send it to soldiers fighting in the battlefield.

1600’s.. the Pennsylvania Dutch were eating a version of Chicken and Waffles; however, instead of frying their poultry, they used boiled or roasted chicken, which was then shredded and put on top of waffles with gravy instead of syrup

Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1790s after Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron from France. Recipes for waffles and chicken soon appeared in cookbooks. Because African Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African American families.”

Some historians place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of African Americans to the North. Fried chicken was a common breakfast meat, and serving “a breakfast bread with whatever meat [was available] comes out of the rural tradition.” The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.

Southern cooking would find its way up North, as slaves—freed after the Civil War—were lured by rumor of better jobs and opportunities. The dish can be found in the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells jazz nightclub, and Wells Supper Club

Serving up chicken & waffles”. Los Angeles Business Journal. September 22, 1997. p. 1.

http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2011/03/chicken_and_waffles_a_history_of_a_black_culinary_tradition.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_and_waffles

photos

prettypersistent asked: Aladdin or Flubber?

(Source: oswaldofloxley, via definitionofdisney)

photo

nostrokesjuststrudels:

kelbebop:

I think Pooh is supposed to be dressed as a bee, but it looks like he’s sporting a stylish black two-piece. Kudos, Hallmark.

fierce

nostrokesjuststrudels:

kelbebop:

I think Pooh is supposed to be dressed as a bee, but it looks like he’s sporting a stylish black two-piece. Kudos, Hallmark.

fierce

(via ruinedchildhood)

photos

photos

Andrew Scott for Attitude Magazine

(Source: moriartysdance, via andwooscott)

photo

toss-me-inside-a-hefty:

flocodenuvem:

Amor

His nose looks so different in this pic! I love it! ♥

toss-me-inside-a-hefty:

flocodenuvem:

Amor

His nose looks so different in this pic! I love it! ♥

(Source: ilovemikepatton)